Effective Social Media: Conversions in Permission Markets

Suze Cumming | August 18, 2016

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With Suze on the brink of returning from sea I, Ali, will share a final week’s worth of thoughts on social media. In the past two weeks I’ve written, with the help of Melanie Piche, about using your website and Facebook in ways that are deliberate, engaging and successful. Hopefully, the past couple of blogs have given you a different perspective on how to very authentically engage with potential and past clients through social media. In addition to the challenge of engaging, as you know, is the challenge of turning online engagement into  business. So today, I will delve into this area and talk about the details of conversions in permission markets. 

16.08.18 Content andConversions

When it comes to creating content that will engage your network, and lead them into becoming clients, it’s all about trust. By using content to build trust, we’re taking advantage of what Melanie calls “permission markets”.

“The premise behind online lead generation is different than door knocking/ cold calling or post carding: they come to you rather than you going to them. Traditional lead generation is interruption marketing. Permission marketing is when THEY choose to interact with YOU because they like what you’re saying and doing online.”

This can be a scary idea because it takes the engagement out of your hands. However, it can also be incredibly effective if you’re willing to do the work to create amazing content and really think about what is of value to people. The risk with permission markets is that realtors can have a disconnect about what content is valuable based on what they’re offering or the way that potential clients use social media.

Establishing what type of content outlines your unique approach, and is interesting to your sphere takes personal vision and thought.

Melanie shared the approach she takes. She strives to write 3 types of content:

Evergreen content: Answering basic questions and concerns that people will be searching the web for (ex. Neighbourhood guides or posts answering common questions).

News-worthy content: Information about current events in real estate that will engage those looking to buy or sell soon.

Opinion pieces: To help people get to know who she is and what’s unique about her take on real estate. When it comes to opinion pieces, Melanie advises, “They are often based on your own values, thoughts and opinions. They can be controversial, but the goal is to get a reaction from people (ideally a positive one).”

Ultimately, when it comes to content creation, the exact approach has to be your own, because powerful content communicates your uniqueness and will spark most for the clients who are ultimately those that will get the best experience from working with you. The order of your approach, however, should be different than you’re used to in marketing. First, figure out what your community or sphere needs and would benefit from, then find a method to get that information to them in a way that will strengthen your business.

 

 

Effective Social Media: Conversions in Permission Markets

Suze Cumming | August 18, 2016

Share this page on Facebook
Tweet this page on Twitter
Share this page on LinkedIn

 

With Suze on the brink of returning from sea I, Ali, will share a final week’s worth of thoughts on social media. In the past two weeks I’ve written, with the help of Melanie Piche, about using your website and Facebook in ways that are deliberate, engaging and successful. Hopefully, the past couple of blogs have given you a different perspective on how to very authentically engage with potential and past clients through social media. In addition to the challenge of engaging, as you know, is the challenge of turning online engagement into  business. So today, I will delve into this area and talk about the details of conversions in permission markets. 

16.08.18 Content andConversions

When it comes to creating content that will engage your network, and lead them into becoming clients, it’s all about trust. By using content to build trust, we’re taking advantage of what Melanie calls “permission markets”.

“The premise behind online lead generation is different than door knocking/ cold calling or post carding: they come to you rather than you going to them. Traditional lead generation is interruption marketing. Permission marketing is when THEY choose to interact with YOU because they like what you’re saying and doing online.”

This can be a scary idea because it takes the engagement out of your hands. However, it can also be incredibly effective if you’re willing to do the work to create amazing content and really think about what is of value to people. The risk with permission markets is that realtors can have a disconnect about what content is valuable based on what they’re offering or the way that potential clients use social media.

Establishing what type of content outlines your unique approach, and is interesting to your sphere takes personal vision and thought.

Melanie shared the approach she takes. She strives to write 3 types of content:

Evergreen content: Answering basic questions and concerns that people will be searching the web for (ex. Neighbourhood guides or posts answering common questions).

News-worthy content: Information about current events in real estate that will engage those looking to buy or sell soon.

Opinion pieces: To help people get to know who she is and what’s unique about her take on real estate. When it comes to opinion pieces, Melanie advises, “They are often based on your own values, thoughts and opinions. They can be controversial, but the goal is to get a reaction from people (ideally a positive one).”

Ultimately, when it comes to content creation, the exact approach has to be your own, because powerful content communicates your uniqueness and will spark most for the clients who are ultimately those that will get the best experience from working with you. The order of your approach, however, should be different than you’re used to in marketing. First, figure out what your community or sphere needs and would benefit from, then find a method to get that information to them in a way that will strengthen your business.

 

 

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