On Being Engaging vs. Irritating

Suze Cumming | April 26, 2018

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The number one fear that I hear from real estate agents is that they don’t want to be pushy, salesy, bothersome or appear desperate.  The belief is that if you call people to ask for business this will be the result and they are right.  I find it irritating, don’t you?  And yet, 98% of trainers and coaches will tell you to make these types of calls.  No wonder we are all riddled with anxiety.

Past blog posts have postulated that when we push against our resistance we increase it.

So let’s stop pushing.

Let’s stop pushing ourselves to do things that make us feel anxious and let’s stop doing things that make our “Sphere of Influence” question their taste in friends.

To thrive in Real Estate, you need to have many conversations with people about real estate with the aim of finding people that need to sell (or buy).  How you choose to have those conversations doesn’t much matter.  All that matters is that you have them and you have them in a way that is engaging, builds trust and makes people want to share their story with you. 

Here are the key points to make your conversations engaging:

Make it about them.  Make it valuable.  Make it interesting.

If you are going to make phone calls to the people you know, have a purpose for that call.  It could be as simple as, “The Real Estate market is a little crazy right now and I’m reaching out to people I know to see if there is any curiosities or questions they have about this nutty market.”  Or, “ A home just around the corner from you went up for sale and I thought I would just give you a quick call and see if you have any inside information on that house;  we have a buyer who may be bidding.”  If the calls are to past buyers: Perhaps their kids were concerned about the new school.  Ask how that’s working out.   Then, read the social cues you receive from them.  This is social intelligence and it’s critical to engagement.

We’ve built a new info-graphic to show the interaction of the three factors to build engagement, connection and trust.  We call this the connection triangle and we will be bringing you some live webinars soon.  Stay tuned.

 

On Being Engaging vs. Irritating

Suze Cumming | April 26, 2018

Share this page on Facebook
Tweet this page on Twitter
Share this page on LinkedIn

 

The number one fear that I hear from real estate agents is that they don’t want to be pushy, salesy, bothersome or appear desperate.  The belief is that if you call people to ask for business this will be the result and they are right.  I find it irritating, don’t you?  And yet, 98% of trainers and coaches will tell you to make these types of calls.  No wonder we are all riddled with anxiety.

Past blog posts have postulated that when we push against our resistance we increase it.

So let’s stop pushing.

Let’s stop pushing ourselves to do things that make us feel anxious and let’s stop doing things that make our “Sphere of Influence” question their taste in friends.

To thrive in Real Estate, you need to have many conversations with people about real estate with the aim of finding people that need to sell (or buy).  How you choose to have those conversations doesn’t much matter.  All that matters is that you have them and you have them in a way that is engaging, builds trust and makes people want to share their story with you. 

Here are the key points to make your conversations engaging:

Make it about them.  Make it valuable.  Make it interesting.

If you are going to make phone calls to the people you know, have a purpose for that call.  It could be as simple as, “The Real Estate market is a little crazy right now and I’m reaching out to people I know to see if there is any curiosities or questions they have about this nutty market.”  Or, “ A home just around the corner from you went up for sale and I thought I would just give you a quick call and see if you have any inside information on that house;  we have a buyer who may be bidding.”  If the calls are to past buyers: Perhaps their kids were concerned about the new school.  Ask how that’s working out.   Then, read the social cues you receive from them.  This is social intelligence and it’s critical to engagement.

We’ve built a new info-graphic to show the interaction of the three factors to build engagement, connection and trust.  We call this the connection triangle and we will be bringing you some live webinars soon.  Stay tuned.

 

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