Update your real estate tools!

Suze Cumming | June 1, 2013

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Dear Zeuss,

I’ve been in the business for many years and have always prided myself on a successful listing presentation.  Recently, I’ve lost a few listings to newer agents with a lot less experience and I’m feeling really frustrated.  I know that I can sell homes in my neighbourhood for more money than anyone else, but for some reason these homeowners are choosing younger agents.  Is it my age or what?

Norm

Dear Norm,

Ouch, sounds painful.  Well Norm, I’m an old guy too (well, gal) and it sure is convenient to blame ageism for our inability to adapt to the new real estate tools.   Sorry – no gentle answer here.  The world constantly changes and if we want to be a part of the buzz we need to adapt and update our real estate tools.   It does seem that the most recent rash of changes has been faster and more foundational than in the past, but that could just be my age!

The good news – only the tools have changed.  What people want and need in an agent is very much the same as it was in the last millennium. They want to be heard, taken care of, and understood.  They want to feel secure in their decision to hire someone to represent them in a complicated process that matters.

Start by, taking an inventory of what you are good at:  analyze your experience, your knowledge, your skills, and your judgement.  Take the time to write the inventory out and then reflect on the value that those things have for your prospects and clients.  Really own the fact that you are a valuable asset to someone who needs to sell their property.

Now, take an inventory of your current real estate tools and find out what’s missing.  Is it a dated online presence?  Is your social media intelligence a little low?  Perhaps your confidence is a little shaken and you are not giving off the best vibe in your presentations.   Whatever it is, have the courage to look at this honestly and directly.  Seek feedback from colleagues, your manager, good friends, or a coach.  Accept this feedback and take ownership of the shadows that you defined together.

Once you have all the information, design your comeback.  There is no shortage of highly productive mature agents across the country. Most of them have had to consciously adjust, adapt, and make a commitment to stay valuable.  You can to, if you want it badly enough.  Do you?

So – gather hold of what you are good at,  build your belief and confidence around the importance of that and hire some really smart young people to teach you the new real estate tools!

Zeuss

Columnist, The Nature of Real Estate

 

Dear Zuess is a column dedicated to offering advice for real estate agents that want to create lasting connections with their clients. Do you have  any  specific real estate tools that bother you? Drop Zuess a line at suzecumming@shaw.ca

 

Update your real estate tools!

Suze Cumming | June 1, 2013

Share this page on Facebook
Tweet this page on Twitter
Share this page on LinkedIn

 

Dear Zeuss,

I’ve been in the business for many years and have always prided myself on a successful listing presentation.  Recently, I’ve lost a few listings to newer agents with a lot less experience and I’m feeling really frustrated.  I know that I can sell homes in my neighbourhood for more money than anyone else, but for some reason these homeowners are choosing younger agents.  Is it my age or what?

Norm

Dear Norm,

Ouch, sounds painful.  Well Norm, I’m an old guy too (well, gal) and it sure is convenient to blame ageism for our inability to adapt to the new real estate tools.   Sorry – no gentle answer here.  The world constantly changes and if we want to be a part of the buzz we need to adapt and update our real estate tools.   It does seem that the most recent rash of changes has been faster and more foundational than in the past, but that could just be my age!

The good news – only the tools have changed.  What people want and need in an agent is very much the same as it was in the last millennium. They want to be heard, taken care of, and understood.  They want to feel secure in their decision to hire someone to represent them in a complicated process that matters.

Start by, taking an inventory of what you are good at:  analyze your experience, your knowledge, your skills, and your judgement.  Take the time to write the inventory out and then reflect on the value that those things have for your prospects and clients.  Really own the fact that you are a valuable asset to someone who needs to sell their property.

Now, take an inventory of your current real estate tools and find out what’s missing.  Is it a dated online presence?  Is your social media intelligence a little low?  Perhaps your confidence is a little shaken and you are not giving off the best vibe in your presentations.   Whatever it is, have the courage to look at this honestly and directly.  Seek feedback from colleagues, your manager, good friends, or a coach.  Accept this feedback and take ownership of the shadows that you defined together.

Once you have all the information, design your comeback.  There is no shortage of highly productive mature agents across the country. Most of them have had to consciously adjust, adapt, and make a commitment to stay valuable.  You can to, if you want it badly enough.  Do you?

So – gather hold of what you are good at,  build your belief and confidence around the importance of that and hire some really smart young people to teach you the new real estate tools!

Zeuss

Columnist, The Nature of Real Estate

 

Dear Zuess is a column dedicated to offering advice for real estate agents that want to create lasting connections with their clients. Do you have  any  specific real estate tools that bother you? Drop Zuess a line at suzecumming@shaw.ca

 

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