Supply and Demand of Attention

Suze Cumming | February 6, 2014

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Supply and Demand of Attention

1.

“I post brilliant, valuable content and no one comments”“I told them that this wouldn’t work out but they just didn’t hear me”

“I send emails, I leave messages and people don’t reply”

It’s getting very difficult to get people’s attention.

As the quantity of information nears infinity, the value of that information plummets.  It’s simply a matter of supply and demand.  At the same time, the value of attention magnifies. As it becomes increasingly difficult to get and hold the attention of anyone, that attention becomes extremely valuable.

What does it take to get it?

Telling them what we think, what we know and how professional we are won’t work.  They hear that everywhere.

What if we show them how much we care, respect their needs and desires, and reach out to them in the environment that they choose?  What if we asked about and responded to them?  What would happen if we were able to solve their problems – their real problems, not the ones we imagine for them?

Shouting the loudest no longer earns you the attention you seek.  You need new skills, new perspectives and a deep commitment to learning about other people if you want to thrive in the age of limited attention.

Supply and Demand of Attention

Suze Cumming | February 6, 2014

Share this page on Facebook
Tweet this page on Twitter
Share this page on LinkedIn

 

Supply and Demand of Attention

1.

“I post brilliant, valuable content and no one comments”“I told them that this wouldn’t work out but they just didn’t hear me”

“I send emails, I leave messages and people don’t reply”

It’s getting very difficult to get people’s attention.

As the quantity of information nears infinity, the value of that information plummets.  It’s simply a matter of supply and demand.  At the same time, the value of attention magnifies. As it becomes increasingly difficult to get and hold the attention of anyone, that attention becomes extremely valuable.

What does it take to get it?

Telling them what we think, what we know and how professional we are won’t work.  They hear that everywhere.

What if we show them how much we care, respect their needs and desires, and reach out to them in the environment that they choose?  What if we asked about and responded to them?  What would happen if we were able to solve their problems – their real problems, not the ones we imagine for them?

Shouting the loudest no longer earns you the attention you seek.  You need new skills, new perspectives and a deep commitment to learning about other people if you want to thrive in the age of limited attention.

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